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Tumble Dryer Not Heating Up

If you’re suffering from a busy schedule a tumble dryer will help get your clothes dry far quicker than leaving them to hang. Tumble drying is not only quicker but makes your clothes feel softer and fresh, whilst preventing mould and condensation from building up in your rooms.

If your garments are coming out as damp as when you first put them in, with our help you’ll soon have your favourite garments dry, without waiting for days.

Cause 1

Thermostat

So if your dryer is not heating, the most likely cause may be the thermostat - usually located above the heating element. To access them you will need to remove the cover that can be found on the element. To check the thermostat for faults:

Safety First! Please make sure that you have disconnected the appliance from the mains before beginning any repair.

  • Using a multimeter, test the thermostat by measuring the resistance. It should read less than an Ohm on the lowest resistance setting (See here for instruction on how to use a multimeter).
  • Depending on your model of dryer; the thermostat may have a small button between the electrical connections - carefully press it whilst listening for a click. Thermostats usually cut out for a number of reasons:
  • Overheating can be caused by blocked filters and condensers.
  • Frequently switching the dryer off mid-cycle causes the element to overheat as the air cooling stops.
  • Ventilation problems.

If the existing thermostat is faulty and requires a replacement, browse our extensive range of tumble dryer spares.

For help to remove and replace the faulty thermostat see our guide to get the heat back in your dryer.

How To >


Cause 2

Heating Element

The most common reason why your dryer may have stopped heating is usually related to the element. To diagnose the root of the faulty element follow the below steps:

Safety First! Please make sure that you have disconnected the appliance from the mains before beginning any repair.

  • Removing the back panel of your dryer you should easily be able to identify a faulty element. Identification should be clearly noticeable from physical damage. However if for some reason the heater appears visually fine then it would be recommended to test for resistance using a multimeter (See here for instruction on how to use a multimeter).
  • Depending on your model, when testing for resistance you should be looking for a reading between 25 - 60 Ohms. If you get a “zero” reading or it is excessively over the typical value then you bet your bottom dollar that the heating element will require replacing.

Change the heating element to get your problem dealt with. We’ve even got a how-to video to guide you through the repair.

How To >